Tag Archives: Reserve Street Armory

Spring 2017 Update

The folks involved with Armory Subcommittee continue to get questions about the Armory’s status. Here’s a limited update as of March 15, 2017.

Armory after one of the many spring rains. —late April, 2017

The building exterior is in pretty nice shape and holding up well; the landscaping is established and continues to be maintained. We hear the interior lobby and stairwell are underway and should be complete later this spring. We will post pictures as available.

With ample space for parking and compatible development, the Armory presents great opportunities.

No word as yet on potential tenants, although subcommittee members stand ready to assist in any way possible in the quest for a tenant to complement the building and neighborhood zoning and character. As anyone who has seen this building and setting knows, the Armory is an exceptional property in a strategic location…ideal for a mixed-used neighborhood activity hub with a combination of retail, food and beverage, community space, workforce housing and commercial uses.

The Armory sits at the base of Boise’s Military Reserve trail system, with world-class, mixed-use hiking and biking.

Portland’s Armory Repurposed as Gerding Theater

Thanks to sharp-eyed preservationist  and planner John Bertram for sharing information on Portland’s own historic Armory, which he says enjoys wide support and visibility.

John was visiting Portland recently and says he…

“…discovered the Portland Armory behind Powell’s Books on Davis and 10th Ave. It was built in 1891 and placed on the NR [National Register] in 2000.  A developer purchased it in 1999 as part of the Brewery Blocks package and sold it to the Portland Dev. Corporation (urban renewal agency) in 2003.  Funds were raised along with New Market Tax Credits (NMTC) and  historic tax credits to restore the exterior and build a new structure within the interior.

Renamed the Gerding Theater at the Armory, it now houses Portland Center Stage (non profit), with two theaters, a café, offices, and support space. The Armory is open to the public, reimagined and renovated on four pillars: history, theater, sustainability, and community.”

See John’s photos below:

PA large theater Port Armory blt 1891 Port Armory entrance Port Armory lobby 1 Port Armory Lobby 2 Port Armory plaque

2015 Spring Work Begins on Armory

Lots of folks are curious about the status of the Armory. After months of inactivity, work began on a few general improvements about a month ago. I spoke with Mike with J&M earlier this year and he gave me a rundown on the goals of the current push:

  • Daylighting basement windows. The roughly 7,000 sq. ft. below-grade spaces facing Reserve Street will be getting slightly larger glazed openings.
  • Enlarging window wells. The old window wells were pretty small, so workers have excavated a large trench that will slope up toward ground level to create a berm that allows more light to reach the windows.
  • Retaining wall. The top of the berm will feature an 18″ retaining wall with deep footings. This will keep water and other unwanted things out of the window wells.
  • Drainage system. This will add to the protection of the below-grade space from potential flood events.
  • Seismic reinforcement. Due to the age of the structure, additional work will helped stabilize walls in the event of any seismic activity.

I got a tour from Gene, one of the workers on site. He mentioned how much everyone enjoys working in the space, surrounded by history and the amazing natural light. Here are a few photos showing the interior spaces and a few exterior details. Thanks to Mike and Gene for helping answer some questions; neighbors are understandably curious.

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2nd Floor NE space showing morning sunlight. This level, like the Main Floor and day-lit basement contains about 7,000 sq. ft.

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NE corner showing excavation for light well (against building) and retaining wall (trench at right adjacent to pavement). Forms are no in place and concrete should be poured in coming weeks.

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14,400 sq. ft. Drill Hall, roughly 80′ X 180′ of unobstructed space, showing the original bowstring trusses supporting the arched middle roof. The lower left wall shows openings into the rear section of the building, that originally housed the National Guard stables and horses.

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East wall looking toward the rear of the building. The front section contains approximately 21,000 sq. ft. on three levels, the middle section with 14,400 sq. ft., and the rear single-level section with approximately 5,000 sq. ft.

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Interior panorama of rear single-level space, originally housing the stables for the Idaho National Guard.

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Original bowstring trusses (above) and detail of the roof framing and structure, which includes repurposed dimensional-lumber concrete board forms used in the 1937 construction. The second floor wings were added in the 50s, when workers had access to plywood for forms. This is why the texture and original colors were different from early ours to later pours.

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Roof detail showing repurposed 1937 concrete board forms. This was the depression, so nothing was wasted.

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NE Corner showing board forms and concrete prep. Owner characterized finished retaining walls as “Eighteen inches above grade.”

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View SE from west corner of Armory showing footings for retaining wall.

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View west from NE corner showing forms for retaining wall.